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Open for browsing: FALL HOURS: Weds-Sat 11:00-5:00, Sun 12:00-4:00. Masks are optional for vaccinated customers, but it is recommended that everyone wear masks due to recent increased case numbers. Still offering mail order & pickup. Please email michelle.souliere@gmail.com for used book ordering, or call (207)253-6808. Thank you! We continue to add brand new inventory to this site to help you shop easily.
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Storm by George R. Stewart
NYRB

Storm by George R. Stewart

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Trade paperback format. Introduction by Nathaniel Rich.

With Storm, first published in 1941, George R. Stewart invented a new genre of fiction: the eco-novel. California has been plunged into drought throughout the summer and fall when a ship reports an unusual barometric reading from the far western Pacific. In San Francisco, a junior meteorologist in the Weather Bureau takes note of the anomaly and plots “an incipient little whorl” on the weather map, a developing storm, he suspects, that he privately dubs Maria. Stewart’s novel tracks Maria’s progress to and beyond the shores of the United States through the eyes of meteorologists, linemen, snowplow operators, a general, a couple of decamping lovebirds, and an unlucky owl, and the storm, surging and ebbing, will bring long-needed rain, flooded roads, deep snows, accidents, and death. Storm is an epic account of humanity’s relationship to and dependence on the natural world.

Praise

Man versus nature, and the ability of humans to cope under environmental stress, are Stewart’s two obsessions. He is at once a chronicler of the achievements and architectures of modern civilization and an ecological fatalist. . . . In Storm, he went so far as to write what he called a biography of the weather.
—Christine Smallwood, The Nation