Now open limited hours for browsing: Weds-Sat 12:00-4:00. Still offering mail order & curbside pickup. Please email michelle.souliere@gmail.com for used book ordering. Thank you! We are slowly adding brand new inventory to this site to help you shop easily.
Now open limited hours for browsing: Weds-Sat 12:00-4:00. Still offering mail order & curbside pickup. Please email michelle.souliere@gmail.com for used book ordering. Thank you! We are slowly adding brand new inventory to this site to help you shop easily.
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The Dong with the Luminous Nose by Edward Gorey & Edward Lear
The Dong with the Luminous Nose by Edward Gorey & Edward Lear
Pomegranate

The Dong with the Luminous Nose by Edward Gorey & Edward Lear

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Hardcover format.

If you know the story of the Jumblies, that happy-go-lucky clan of sailors in a sieve, then you’ll be eager to learn more of their saga in this charming love story–poem, penned by the master of nonsense verse, Edward Lear (English, 1812–1888), and illustrated by the master of brilliant, offbeat images, Edward Gorey (American, 1925–2000).

As it turns out, the Jumblies made at least one stop during their long journey, and there, on the Hills of the Chankly Bore, a passionate relationship was born—between a Jumbly girl and the Dong. The end of the story is sad but sweet, and it stars a nose that can light up a forest, light up the sky! The Dong is some kind of hero, certainly, and he can’t help but win our hearts with that protuberant proboscis of his.

The Dong with a Luminous Nose and The Jumblies (also published by Pomegranate) present two of the most finely rendered suites of drawings ever created by Edward Gorey. With Edward Lear’s irresistible verses, the books are timeless classics to be enjoyed through generations, by children of all ages, four to eighty-four.

About the ARTIST
Edward St. John Gorey was a Harvard grad, a brilliant artist, a celebrated set and costume designer (his costumes for a Broadway production of Dracula earned him a Tony Award), a lover of animals (particularly cats) and the arts (he seldom missed a performance of the New York City Ballet), and an avid deltiologist—an obscure word so Gorey—like you might think he invented it himself (it means “a collector of postcards”). His humorously unsettling drawings of vaguely Victorian innocents often facing unfortunate ends became familiar to a wide audience after appearing in the opening credits of the PBS television series Mystery!